Large Barion Cut Spruce Green Cushion.

Bigger spruce green Barion cushion, mixing colors with cut This beautiful gemstones is a Barion cushion and has great crystal and appears to be eye clean. Its darker toned green has just a touch of blue, that I call spruce. It weighs 9.52 carats.

I have a friend that I work with to make beautiful jewelry.  He is an excellent goldsmith and I hope to have some of his work with my stones on this site.  He would look at my collection, which he likes, and say that I should get rough to make this or that stone, because it would be beautiful. (he appreciates my limitations better now)  I could not agree more, but mother nature and my pocket book makes many dreams impossible.

If I had one of my dreams fulfilled, it would include rough like I got years ago, that produced the posted stone.  The rough was dichroic with both colors being attractive and compatible.  It also had a ratio of about one and third to one for its length to width ratio, along with a depth thick enough for a Barion cushion to be cut efficiently.  It is particularly important that the depth from the natural girdle of the rough include room for a deeper crown or too much material would be wasted.

Now to the posted stone.  It is a great darker toned spruce green Barion cut of 9.52 carats.  I thought quite a while before I came up with spruce, but it has a green that has just a touch of green and it is so attractive that it needed a distinctive name.  And spruce does fit both its hue(color) and tone level.  For this gemstone is a creature of the forest, but you would pick it out of the dark areas because of its radiating flash.  The light green a/b axis color dominates the middle of the stone and the richer c axis color fills the end of this eye clean cushion.

Bruce

About Bruce Fry

I was born in Summit, NJ in 1947 and graduated from Summit High School in 1966. I graduated from the Colorado School of Mines in 1970 and after spending another year in graduate school, I left to see the world of Brazil. After spending some more time discovering myself, I ended up working for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for 32 years as an Air Quality Engineer in the Department of Environmental Protection. I retired in 2007 and took up faceting gemstones again after a long hiatus that reached back to my twenties. I had started cutting cabochons when I was 13 and bought my first faceting machine when I was 15, but ran out of money and time until I retired. My great love in gemology is tourmaline and the collection presented here represents my effort to get as much beauty and variety in the colors of tourmaline as I can. I was particularly lucky in being able to get unheated cuprian tourmaline before copper was discovered in gem grade tourmaline from Mozambique.
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